Reading helps writing

Human development is often sequential: a child must learn to walk in order to run, listen in order to speak, and learn in order to teach. The development of a writer is also sequential: one must learn to read in order to write. Reading is the means to experience, study, and absorb writing, and, because of that, reading is more instrumental to improve one’s writing than to write.

Do you want to understand how to write powerful stories using simple sentences? Read Ernest Hemingway. Do you want to to find a voice that is accessible to youth? Read J.K. Rowling. Do you want to create believable characters that are shaped by the world around them? Read Kentaro Miura’s “Berserk.” Do you want to be told what some basic techniques any writer uses? Go out and buy Roy Peter Clarks’ “Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer,” and read that more devotedly than the Bible. Reading that is how I became aware of tool 8: establish a pattern, then give it a twist. The first eight sentences of this paragraph are an example of that tool.

For esports writers, reading the works of others is also an important part of improving in the field. The analytical works of a dedicated follower of a scene can serve as notes for you to study and understand a team, saving you countless of hours vod reviewing. You can catch up on the history of a player and get up to date with the narrative stakes of a tournament. You can see how some writers can approach the same topic differently, what analogies, metaphors, pictures, data, or other supplements they implement and how they crafted their voice. Of course, be sure you are reading a writer who knows their shit, and do your own research to see if you agree or disagree with some conclusions.

The most important reason to read is that it opens your mind to new ideas and ways of thinking. Writing your own thoughts teaches you nothing, as you can only write what you know. Reading others’ teaches you things you might not have learned otherwise. The best kind of writer is one who can read others and integrate the lessons they learn from them into their own work.

Facebook Comments