The Shanghai Major is an unequivocal disaster

Any fans hoping Valve Corporation’s problems with the Shanghai Major would be isolated to the group stage were wrong.

Very wrong.

By all accounts, the Dota 2 major has been a disaster. It started last week, when Valve fired one of the hosts for the event, James “2GD” Harding, with head Gabe Newell calling him an “ass” on Reddit.

Valve then fired the event’s production company after a slew of technical issues.

The playoff stage, which began Tuesday night, has been worse. Somehow.

The event was supposed to begin with an opening ceremony last night at close to 9 p.m. EST but was reportedly delayed (and here was some thought it had been cancelled).

When the ceremony finally started, the broadcast was marred by a choppy stream:

The start of games was then delayed, potentially because of an unstable internet connection, with varying reports of how long it lasted. But it appeared to be hours.

At least one delay was caused by a member of the staff losing the keyboard of a Team Spirit player.

There are even two organized Reddit threads logging complaint that have been levied during the event.

Perhaps the worst part of the entire event (and that’s saying something) is the cost of the delays to the spectators in attendance. The host venue, the Mercedes Benz Arena, apparently has a curfew. For this event, it was 10 p.m. local time. (9 a.m. EST).

So everybody had to leave, even though there were more matches to be played. Some took place in an empty arena, with others to be finished online.

Kyle “swindlezz” Freedman, captain for compLexity Gaming, let out his frustrations in a lengthy Twitter rant.

Other casters and workers have posted on social media showing some of the myriad other problems involved in the event. Here’s a running log of their posts, as well as some from prominent people in Dota 2 and esports:

Kyle Bautista, general manager for compLexity Gaming, made a good point about the production company (which were echoed by swindlezz):

It takes talent for a company to be able to have its head publicly call somebody an “ass” and somehow have that buried in a shitstorm of more bad PR.

Well done, Valve.

Slingshot Editor-In-Chief. Former newspaper reporter from Cleveland, Ohio.

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