UOL Move on winning IEM Oakland, solo queue demeanor and goals for 2017

Slingshot’s Andrew Kim caught up with Unicorns Of Love’s Kang “Move” Min-su after UOL won IEM Oakland on Sunday. They talked about the tournament, practice restrictions and goals for next season.

Andrew Kim: Congratulations on your IEM Oakland championship. How do you feel?

Kang “Move” Min-su: Since we won a losing game, I still can’t really believe it.

AK: You used to play in North America before your addition to Unicorns of Love. You not only changed teams but entire regions. Did you notice any large differences?

KMS: Each region has their own play style. For instance when I was in NA, the players played a bit more aggressively but I felt that the junglers in Europe were comparatively better, so I played a bit defensively, so it’s kind of tough.

AK: How do you communicate with the rest of the team?

KMS: Our team is made up of all different nationalities, so we try to use English for communication. Everyone but me on the team are really good at it, too, so I think I can step up in that regard. I’ll be able to communicate with my team no problem.

AK: Since you’ll be part of the 2017 for the Unicorns, do you feel any more confident since you ended the year with an international tournament victory?

KMS: Rather than saying I’m more confident, by playing in this international tournament, I felt that the opposing jungler was much better than me. So I want to work hard and do better than the other teams.

AK: As a professional, where do you think League of Legends both inside and outside the game?

KMS: In either way I think things got better. For example, before when you would play solo queue, there were a lot of cases when ill-mannered players would not be punished for their actions, but I think it’s become a lot more comfortable to play now because they have been proactive in that regard. Outside the game, Riot is doing a good job in promoting teams and stuff so I think it’s a lot better.

AK: IEM Oakland ended up being in a very awkward time period, games being played on patch 6.21 instead of 6.22. Did you have any difficulties that were because of the timing of the tournament?

KMS: Since the live patch is 6.22, it was difficult to practice. When we were in Europe, the other teams weren’t interested in patch 6.21 so we couldn’t do scrims. On the other hand, though, I think the other teams were in the same boat, so I think we all played in tough conditions.

AK: Speaking of the 6.22, there’s been a lot of changes such as the new jungle fruits and assassin updates. If you played any games on 6.22, what are some of your thoughts on it?

KMS: Personally I like 6.22 a lot because they removed the smite-buffs you would get from jungle monsters, which I really didn’t like. With no more oracles, stuns, and such are gone, I feel like I don’t feel pressured to smite every camp.

AK: Against the Flash Wolves, the match ended up being five games with the first one going over 50 minutes. It must have been tough on you both physically and mentally, so how did you deal with the fatigue?

KMS: My teammates all have strong mentalities, so even in losing situations, we thought about winning the late game fights all five games, so I think we got the win.

AK: Finally, with 2017 ahead of you, what are some of your goals for the spring and summer split?

KMS: For 2017 my personal goal is to make it to the finals of the LCS. I would really like to.

Cover photo courtesy of Riot Games

Slingshot staff writer and Korean League of Legends expert who also owns a Pikachu-themed iPhone case.

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