Chaser: “When I heard Dignitas will be getting the support of an NBA team, I thought that they will have a great environment as well as a support structure.”

Dignitas jungler Lee “Chaser” Sang-hyun played with the Jin Air Green Wings in 2015 and with Longzhu Gaming this year. Chaser made a name for himself by being a jungler capable of carrying his team through snowballing. Although his performance fell with the rest of the team since his move to Longzhu, his mechanics were still intact, showing timely ganks when needed.

Slingshot’s Andrew Kim had the chance to talk briefly with Chaser (in Korean and translated into English) about his move to Dignitas, playing for Longzhu and playing abroad with other Koreans.

Andrew Kim: You have spent a long time in Korea: first in Jin Air, then Longzhu, and now Dignitas.  What was the process like of going to a North American team?

Lee “Chaser” Sang-hyun: After I left Longzhu, I thought a lot about if I wanted to stay in Korea or try to go overseas. When I heard Dignitas will be getting the support of an NBA team, I thought that they will have a great environment as well as a support structure, so I think my decision came to me quickly.

AK: What made Dignitas so tempting?

LSH: The people who are going to Dignitas are people I like, and I also think the other three teammates from NA are great players as well.

AK: After a year in Longzhu you decided to move. Do you have any regrets or disappointments while in Longzhu?

LSH: I had a lot of disappointments. I want to use that as experience and knowhow in order to play well in Dignitas.

AK: You have gotten a lot of different evaluations as a jungler. You’ve been known as a carry-type jungler but you had some rough times in Longzhu as a team, with some saying that your mechanics were still intact. As you move to NA with opinions like that, did you keep those evaluations in mind?

LHS: The 2016 season meta was a carry-jungler meta. As a team, I couldn’t get acclimated, and I had a hard time getting used to the meta. Around November, the meta shifted to one that I can play well, so I was confident that I would be able to play well either in Korea or an another region. I will be looking forward to my own performance in the new season.

AK: How do you measure up compared to the rest of the NA junglers?

LSH: The catalyst of my decision to move was because I think I can bring my performance to it’s peak, and I am also confident that I can win against talented players like Reignover and TSM’s Svenskeren.

AK: Communication and learning English has been important to many imports players. How do you plan to learn English if you need to study?

LSH: I’m very bad at English. I want to communicate as much as I can with my teammates with my lacking English skills, even if it proves to be a source of stress. I also plan to stream to better learn the culture in America as well as the language.

AK: You’ll be coming over with a Korean player and two Korean coaching staff members. Did you have any prior experience or friendship with them?

LSH: I didn’t have a very friendly relationship with them, but I think there is a tendency of Koreans to get closer as they go overseas together. I’m not very concerned, since they are very tentative and I think I’ll get along fine with them.

AK: What are your goals for 2017?

LSH: Team Apex was in the mid to lower tier in the standings last season. I want to bring the team up to the at least to mid to upper tier of the standings, and in order to make that happen I will work very hard so I hope the fans look forward to that.

Cover photo courtesy of Team Dignitas

Slingshot staff writer and Korean League of Legends expert who also owns a Pikachu-themed iPhone case.

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